1000w Double Ended (DE) Bulb & Lamp Comparison Review & Test Including: Philips, Gavita, Ushio, Hortilux, and More.

1000W DE HPS BULB COMPARISSON CHARTS

Hey everyone, Nate from GrowersHouse here, and today we are doing the next comparison which is our double-ended thousand HPS test. We're doing that today because Hortilux just came to market with their new Hortilux DE HPS 1000 Watt and we really wanted to see how it stacks up against the big players in the industry. So, we brought out eight different DE HPS 1000 Watt bulbs, the most popular ones in the industry and we're gonna see how they do against each other. So let's check out your intensity spectrum and run some analysis on them. Let's jump into it! video_gh_title_de1000_comparison_spectrumv2

Okay, so here the test results. So looking at the spectra of these different light bulbs you'll notice that they all marry each other extremely well. The only time you can actually notice that there's any difference in, you know the spectra of these light bulbs is really you know minor differences intensity between them at different wavelengths but they all have the same, really chemical makeup. So we expected the spectrums are the spectra of all these to really look very similar to one another, so no surprise here.

video_gh_title_de1000_comparison_bar_chart4 So let's move on, now you can see you know how we did our testing. We essentially put the light above our 3 x 3 footprint, and we went out to 3 x 3 just because we wanted enough points to get a statistically significant, you know total sum of par, which par is the effectively the photosynthetically active radiation that the lightbulbs giving off. So that's you know the spectrum and the intensity between 400 to 700 nanometers which is the width of the wavelength that plants use best to photosynthesize. So in taking the sum of the intensities and all these points within a three by three area we were able to glean quite a bit of statistical data.

video_gh_de_comp_parcharts_v5
So let me pull it up right now, so here's a chart that shows off you know, what we think is probably the best number to focus on to figure out what lamp really did best in this test which is the total par, which means taking every point that we measured and adding every point that we measured and adding light that turned out to give us the most amount of light using the same ballast and reflector was the Philips Green Power 1000 watt DE HPS and we I honestly our hypothesis was that this lamp would probably do best because we heard from other lighting manufacturers who have done similar testing or even testing using equipment that's far superior to ours including like go Neal motometers and you know 520,000 lighting instruments and things of that sort they were saying that you know Phillips with some of its patented technology they have is really producing just about the best DE lamp out there.

So we recorded the total par of 18,852 and we some of them up, but that said there are four lights that we felt performed pretty well I mean that was the Philips Green Master Power 1000 watt DE HPS being number one and then it looks like the Gavita Pro Plus 1000w DE HPS Lamp and the Ushio DE Enhanced Performance Pro-Plus HPS 1000w Lamp  and then the Genesis and all four of those lights are actually if you add up to some other parties there within about 1.5 percentage of each other so we're not talking about drastic differences i would consider all those bulbs very good, if you want the best bulb out there was found technology probably the Phillips but it seems like the bulbs that are also, I know the Gavita Pro Plus 1000w DE HPS Lamp and the Ushio DE Enhanced Performance Pro-Plus HPS 1000w Lamp  made for sure by that's a German company that makes a lot of really high-end double-ended lamps for quite a few companies and I know that their lamps turned out to be some of the best ones out there. I'm not sure where the Genesis made but it's very possible it's also made by the same factory with maybe some minor tweaks so that said jumping into the lights that we're video_gh_title_de1000_comparison_datatable_v3 not in the top four I mean one of the one of the ones that we were hoping was going to be up there the Hortilux DE HPS 1000 Watt didn't quite make it with their first DE iteration and then looking into maybe what the most bang for your buck is because I know a lot of our customers are interested in that the Nanolux MaxPar DE HPS 1000W Lamp did pretty well believe it came just behind those first four and it is coming in at a cost of about two-thirds the price most the lamps on here most of the that scored in the top four so that’s definitely what we call our price performer and then you know that variance between all of these when we added the sum between the best lamp and the worst lamp was about 7.3 six percent so i would say that's definitely you know you can see the difference in 7.36 percent in in your crop that can be a huge difference especially if you’re on a commercial scale that can be you know definitely multiple thousands of dollars but you know there were not talking about differences in the ten to twenty percent here so that said I mean this is some very interesting information and doing this test you know it got us into thinking about what Lamps are you know or how, how do lamps test if your test multiple the same lamp? So we started doing that testing right now we're going to put out another test we're gonna take like the Philips Green Master Power 1000 watt DE HPS maybe a few other lamps and test like six of the same lamp and see what kind of tests we get to see kind of what variants you have from bulb over bolt so that we know whether that you know these percentages are extremely significant or not or whether it could be just a little bit of chance that gives you a couple percent swing or maybe it's just a fraction of a percent swing!

Other than that. This is Nate from GrowersHouse, thank you very much for visiting our test and you have any questions or comments please give us a call or email. Have a great one! Happy Growing.

1000W DE HPS BULB COMPARISSON CHARTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 thoughts on “1000w Double Ended (DE) Bulb & Lamp Comparison Review & Test Including: Philips, Gavita, Ushio, Hortilux, and More.”

  • Kirk Collier

    You guys lead the pack in providing useful info for growing. Just wanted to criticize slightly. First, the manufacturers claim that the lamps need to be operated for some time (100 hrs?) to stabilize their output. Would this affect your results? Secondly, the bar graphs don't start at zero. This tends to make the differences appear larger than they really are. It would be more informational to show the percentage difference between the lamps. Lastly, can you tell me how your standard deviation was based?

    Great article you guys and very much appreciated.

    Reply
    • Admin

      Hello Krik, thank you for writing. Yes, companies such as Hortilux have mentioned that lamps usually need about 100 hours to "season" the bulbs. I spoke with them about overall total output from hour 1 compared to hour 100 and they said the difference is so negligible that it can't readily be measured with the spectrometer we're using, and differences from lamp to lamp will probably have a bigger variance than the same lamp ran from hour 1 to hour 100. I asked Hortilux if I can run the test after running the bulbs for a 5 hour burn in period to be representative of its overall qualities, and they said yes. So that's what we did. We ran all bulbs for about 5 hours to make sure they were stable, then proceeded with our test.

      We magnified the bar graph to show the differences relative to each other. If we left it with no magnification, you'd see only about a 7% difference between the best and the worst performing bulbs. The graph would be hard to use to compare across each other. In the video I mention reference to this 7% delta.

      Reply
  • John Fritz

    Great video, but I paid around $100 for my Ushio bulbs, and they're even less now, so that MSRP price comparison is way off. I'm not sure about the pricing on the other bulbs.

    Reply
    • Admin

      We thought about including the discounted price we offer the bulbs for on our site instead of MSRP, but since our prices change often due to market conditions, we decided against it and included the MSRP. MSRP is still a good relative indicator of prices when comparing one to another. That said, it's definitely not perfect.

      Reply
  • Theo Tekstra

    There is one very important parameter not in this comparison, and that is light maintenance. Many lamps perform well at first, but lose a lot of light very quickly.

    The best way to measure ppf of course is in an Ulbricht sphere, not by a light integration on a grid, specifically not for a reflector comparison on a 4x4: Any deep reflector will score a lot better on that grid. Very few HPS reflectors will give you a square throw as you have seen in your measurements. Also, uniformity under one lamp is not a metric, unless you have a reflector specifically designed to give you uniformity with a single lamp. Most reflectors are designed (or copied...) to actually generate uniformity in overlapping plans.

    Reply
  • john

    Hello, really enjoy your videos and have been wondering something for a while now, you guys give a lot of data on the differences between the bulbs in there output, however, what about the differences between the ballasts? I would assume that some brands are better than others for different reasons. I was wondering if you take bulb brand X and run it in say 8 or 10 different ballast brands, will there be a difference. Just wondering if other brand bulbs might do better in other ballasts. If you could, I would love to see a video that you took all the different ballasts and tested them on your top 6 bulbs brands from this test to see if there are any major differences.

    Reply
  • michael

    Very nice article, next time maybe include a low end bulb for people on a budget and too see the real difference. Awesome article though helped me out.

    Reply
  • Talson

    Thank you for this and the previous linked article/test with a variable Watt ballast. One question though. In neither article do I notice at what distance from the bulb the PAR was tested. If we assume it was "a distance" to achieve industry standard of 700PAR at canopy, ok, however the distance isn't quoted and would be effected certainly by reflector, bulb orientation, etc.. To relate back to the variable ballast test, if you had enough 'head-room' above your canopy, conceivably you could dial the variable ballast to 600W, for example, lower the bulb/reflector, and still get 700PAR and coverage for the 3'x3'...and you might lower both heat production and power consumption. Conversely, if the lights were already too low above canopy then there would be no where to go when dropped down to 600W on the variable ballast. The height seems crucial in an otherwise very informative and well presented evaluation, in each test/article. Thank you!

    Reply
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